Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN

Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN

Reducing Phosphorus Runoff
Throughout the United States, toxic algal blooms are wreaking havoc on bodies of water, causing pollution and having harmful effects on people, fish and marine mammals.
11/22/2017 06:42 PM
Corn Genetics Research Exposes Mechanism Behind Traits Becoming Silent
For more than a century, plant geneticists have been studying maize as a model system to understand the rules governing the inheritance of traits, and a team of researchers recently unveiled a previously unknown mechanism that triggers gene silencing in corn.
11/21/2017 06:48 PM
Refining Pesticides to Kill Pests, Not Bees
Pyrethroid pesticides are effective. Sometimes too effective.
11/21/2017 06:29 PM
Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet
First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
11/21/2017 05:31 PM
How carbon farming can help solve climate change
Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, nations pledged to keep the average global temperature rise to below 2C above pre-industrial levels and to take efforts to narrow that increase to 1.5C. To meet those goals we must not only stop the increase in our greenhouse gas emissions, we must also draw large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere.The simplest, most cost effective and environmentally beneficial way to do this is right under our feet. We can farm carbon by storing it in our agricultural soils.
11/21/2017 01:06 PM
Thinking Big by Burning Small
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
11/20/2017 05:52 PM
The Hydroponic, Robotic Future of Farming in Greenhouses
When you think of automation, you probably think of the assembly line, a dramatic dance of robot arms with nary a human laborer in sight. But that’s child’s play. The grandest, most disruptive automation revolution has played out in agriculture. First with horses and plows, and eventually with burly combines—technologies that have made farming exponentially cheaper and more productive. Just consider that in 1790, farmers made up 90 percent of the US workforce. In 2012, it was 1.5 percent, yet America still eats.
11/20/2017 05:31 PM