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Africa

Europe's Minority Politicians in Short Supply
PARIS -- Mariam Osman Sherifay is a Muslim woman, born in Egypt. Coskun Coruz left his native Turkey as a child. And Paul Boateng is a soft-spoken and dapper lawyer, a black man who spent most of his childhood in Ghana.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
In Zimbabwe, AIDS Still Means Death
Politics and poverty are depriving Africans in rural areas of relief, even as new drugs stem the disease across the continent.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Joy Tempered by a Wish for a Third World Pope
The selection of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger as the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church drew mixed reaction across Latin America and Africa. Political and church leaders issued warm statements of congratulations, but many people also said they felt a tinge of disappointment that the new pontiff did not come from the Third World.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Nigeria's Rainmaker Is Eyed at Vatican
ONITSHA, Nigeria -- The legend of Cardinal Francis Arinze, a contender to become the first pope from Africa in 1,500 years, stems from a moment of crisis in Nigeria's Catholic heartland. It was the early 1970s, and the government had ordered all European and American priests -- most of the Catholic leadership at the time -- out of the country.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
U.S. Official Ties Sudan Aid to Darfur
OSLO, April 11 -- In a new drive to resolve the humanitarian crisis in Sudan's Darfur region, the Bush administration plans to pledge financial support for the accord that ended Sudan's long-running civil war in January. As a condition of that aid, however, it will request evidence that the Khartoum government is responding to international pressure on Darfur, Deputy Secretary of State Robert B. Zoellick said Monday.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Pakistani Charged With Export Of Devices With Nuclear Uses
A Pakistani businessman illegally exported devices from the United States that could be used to test, develop and detonate nuclear weapons, the government alleged yesterday.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
In South Africa, 'Pro-Life' Has Different Meaning
Catholic AIDS workers facing an epidemic in Africa are arguing against the traditional papal ban on condoms.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Apartheid and Cinema Verity
It's tough to reconcile the truth with "In My Country's" handling of it.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Catholics Crowd Churches to Pray, Celebrate
Anxious Catholics packed churches around the world Friday for special masses, lit candles, held vigils and prayed for Pope John Paul II as he lay near death in his Vatican City apartment.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
In Bow to WTO, India Targets Drug Copying
NEW DELHI, March 23 -- India's parliament gave final approval Wednesday to legislation barring drugmakers from producing low-cost versions of patented medicines from the United States and elsewhere. Public health groups condemned the move, saying it would restrict the supply of anti-HIV drugs in Africa and other developing regions.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
New Name for S. African Capital
On Monday, when the metropolitan council voted to replace the capital's name with an African one, Tshwane, the change brought a feeling of mild vindication to Moses Skhosana.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Kyoto Credits System Seen as Debit
Sajida Khan, who has fought for years to close an apartheid-era dumpsite that she says has sickened many people in her predominantly brown and black community outside Durban, South Africa, was dismayed to learn recently that she faces a surprising new obstacle: the Kyoto global warming treaty.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Portraits of Anywhere but Home
In the wonder world of cinema, South Africa's landscape has doubled as an oil-rich California coastline and a spring break beach in Florida.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Togo Faces Arms Embargo, Travel Ban on Its Leaders
LOME, Togo, Feb. 19 -- West African countries imposed sanctions on Togo Saturday, piling pressure on the country's new leader as thousands of protesters took to the streets to demand he step down.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Pneumonic Plague Seen in Congo Outbreak
CAPE TOWN, South Africa, Feb. 18 -- At least 61 miners in eastern Congo have died and hundreds have become ill from what appears to be the largest outbreak in 80 years of a highly virulent, airborne version of plague, international health officials reported Friday.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
U.S. Resolution Calls for U.N. Peacekeeping Mission in Sudan
The United States circulated a draft U.N. resolution Monday calling for a large peacekeeping force in southern Sudan but dodged the question of what kind of court should try accused war criminals in Darfur.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Mass Protests Against Togo's President Turn Violent
LOME, Togo, Feb. 12 -- Thousands of people opposing Togo's army-installed president burned tires and threw jagged pieces of metal at police Saturday during a second day of demonstrations in the capital of this West African country.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Kenyans Lose an Advocate On Graft
NAIROBI, Feb. 12 -- Kenya's new government awarded a $34 million contract to a foreign firm for a new passport and visa system to prevent attacks such as the 1998 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. But in what became known as the "Anglo-Leasing scandal," top members of the president's office were accused last year of pocketing the money.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
Rwanda's Tormenters Emerge From the Forest to Haunt Congo
A decade after the genocide in Rwanda, as many as 15,000 Hutu guerrillas are still hiding in the dense forests of eastern Congo, according to U.N. peacekeepers.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM
In Togo's Dynastic Transition, An Echo of Yesterday's Africa
When Gnassingbe Eyadema seized power in Togo in 1967, it was the era of the Big Man in Africa. Like many leaders of his generation, Eyadema ruthlessly crushed opposition forces, nurtured a cult of personality, then clung to power decade after decade, growing rich as his tiny West African nation stayed poor.
04/24/2005 11:19 AM